Knowing –Art of Learning

Art of Learning

In Art, are we able to find Excellence in Scarcity?

with 8 comments

In a recent interview of Tom Stoppard on the Charlie Rose Show, Stoppard talks about one of the main characters, a philosopher (I believe is the real life Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin) in his epic Play The Coast of Utopia who has the opportunity to live in France or Germany, countries, at the time where he could write and speak with out fear of being imprisoned (or worst). But he preferred to stay in St. Petersburg, where it was dangerous but where he believed his ideas would be heard. Big Fish Small Pond.

With the Internet, there are a lot of artist, in all categories, who are being seen. But we wonder are we being heard, is there just to much noise? Are we getting drowned out by all of the images that are available?

A post on Art and Perception ask the question on why is there such a focus in some art school on learning how to impress gallery owners, collectors and art magazine editors? What has happen to art for art sake? Are we pandering? Are we not willing to spend the time to go deeper in our work, putting in the effort that would result in art that gets to stand on its own? Martin Amis talks about the need to go deeper when writing, avoiding the expected cartoon version of life when telling a story. Forgive me but George Lucas made the same Star Wars’ movie six times (bless him, but).

When it comes to visual art, I wonder how many of us struggle with the need to go deep and to speak to something in our paintings etc that is not a cliche, but rather an honest interpretation of what it is that we see and want to say about who we are and how we lived. Question,If we went deep would we be heard?

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Written by Bob Martin

February 9, 2007 at 12:56 am

Posted in Art, Painting

8 Responses

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  1. I so agree with you…with what you have said…besides isn’t that what art truly is…”an honest interpretation of what it is that we see and want to say about who we are and how we lived. I believe it is..and yes I believe we would be heard.

    “When it comes to visual art, I wonder how many of us struggle with the need to go deep and to speak to something in our paintings etc that is not a cliche, but rather an honest interpretation of what it is that we see and want to say about who we are and how we lived. Question,If we went deep would we be heard?”

    Linda

    February 10, 2007 at 8:22 am

  2. I love this post! It echos sentiments I have said on my blog over the years, but I have to admit, I have falling prey to not digging deep into my artwork within the past year. And it’s really not on purpose, it was just from lack of time since I decided to get my artwork out there in the community. While professional artists, have the time available to focus on both…it’s very difficult for those of us that work full time outside of the art scene. So this year, I thinking of focusing on just creating, and maybe participating in just one show towards the end of the year so I can dig deep once more.

    Natalie Roberts

    February 11, 2007 at 6:14 pm

  3. Bob, I see ourselves artists like trout who live their lives swimming against the tide who only a few reach the destiny to die in the end…

    Angela

    February 11, 2007 at 7:23 pm

  4. I think this luxury of the art for art’s sake is a recent phenomena. In the old days, instead of pandering to galleries and curators and magazines, artists had to anticipate the responses of the Medicis, the Catholic Church, the King… And the subject matter was equally limited to the church or the king. And does learning to speak to gallery owners immediately exclude going deeper in one’s craft? This reminds me of a recent segment on CBS’ Sunday Morning, that truly inspired me. It was on Ambroise Vollard, a shrewd art dealer hated by the likes of Cezanne and Matisse. What struck me the most was Vollard’s relationship with my hero, Picasso (whose body of work epitomizes going deeper and challenging the staus quo), “With Picasso, Vollard was much more accommodating partly because he knew Picasso’s financial sense was as good as his aesthetic sense. As a result, their relationship lasted for decades. It began in 1901 when Vollard gave Picasso his first show.”

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/12/28/sunday/main2306467.shtml

    Cybel Martin

    February 14, 2007 at 10:55 pm

  5. Linda, Natalie, Angela and Cybel thanks for your contribution to this post. There is a lot here that I would like to respond and add to as well as keeping the conversation going. First, being “heard” is, I’ve come to believe, equal to being honored in a way. Going “Deep” in my thinking is a way to discover and share a view, my view of the world.

    There is a desire to say something that contributes beyond the initial saying of it. Sure sometimes, what we are saying will find itself in the trash. But by our continuing effort to be heard we are trying to create something that will impact another human being. Hopefully a lot of human beings.

    We deserve a lot of credit for what we do.

    Bob Martin

    February 15, 2007 at 9:24 pm

  6. Bob – if we went deep, yes we would be heard, but maybe by fewer people. Or is the objective to be a household name, to be on the lips of many who admire one for a variety of reasons, and maybe not what one wishes to be recognized for? I think it is far better to reach a few persons, profoundly, than many superficially.

    suburbanlife

    February 22, 2007 at 10:31 pm

  7. Suburbanlife, I am in total agreement with you. I am very uncomfortable with pointless hype giving to Britney, Anna Nicole, The Donald etc. Even in tragedy, they are portrayed as cartoon personalities. When taking the opportunity to go deeper, we are at least acknowledging our personal desire to make a difference with some one, a difference that hopefully does not get tossed with the mornings trash.

    Bob Martin

    February 23, 2007 at 10:29 pm

  8. […] (to read the entire post w/comments, click here) […]


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